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Japan’s Largest Family Firms

Family Business United continues to champion the family business sector and is delighted to be able to share details of the largest family firms in Japan.  Like many countries, family firms are the backbone of the Japanese economy and collectively the fifteen largest family firms in Japan have been trading for over 1,290 years.

In terms of turnover they collectively generate turnover of $144,895 million and employ 505 thousand people.

As Paul Andrews, founder and CEO of Family Business United who champion and celebrate the contribution of family firms around the world adds, “The contribution of the top fifteen Japanese family firms should not be under-estimated as it goes far and beyond revenue generation and jobs.  These businesses are at the heart of communities across Japan and make a difference to lives each and every day.  They deserve recognition for the wealth they create, the employment they provide and the support they give to organisations through their philanthropic endeavours too.”

Rank Family Business Year Founded Revenue 2018
$ Millions
Employees
2018
1 Idemitsu Kosan Co. Ltd 1911 $35,127 8,955
2 Fast Retailing Co. Ltd 1949 $19,127 52,839
3 Takenaka Corporation 1610 $12,338 7,500
4 Suntory Beverage Co. Ltd 1899 $11,796 24,142
5 Yamazaki Baking Co. Ltd 1948 $9,656 28,363
6 Bic Camera Inc 1968 $7,616 8,554
7 Yazaki Corporation 1941 $7,565 306,118
8 Yanmar Holdings 1912 $7,429 20,135
9 Otsuka Corporation 1961 $6,926 8,732
10 HSI Co Ltd 1980 $6,451 13,875
11 Sundrug Co. Ltd 1957 $5,312 4,834
12 COSMOS Pharmaceuticals 1983 $5,130 3,849
13 Hikari Tsushin Inc 1988 $4,026 7,225
14 Open House Co. Ltd 1997 $3,443 2,263
15 Pasona Group Inc 1976 $2,863 7,716
Source: PwC and Family Capital Research into the 750 Top Family Businesses
Note - A family or families had to control at least 50% of the voting shares in a private company or at least 32% of the voting rights in a publicly listed company
Note - Only family firms older than 20 years are included allowing a level of transition
from the first generation to some participation of the next generation

 

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